36 Choice Board Prompts for Fiction and Non-Fiction Texts
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Many teachers use the strategy of student choice to increase engagement, reinforce autonomy, and improve learning outcomes. A reading response choice board is a quick and easy way to provide students with an opportunity to make their own decisions, building a sense of agency with the learning process.  Giving students a choice in how they showcase learning is also an effective method for differentiating instruction. All students learn in their own way, and they need to be able to show their individual skills and interests.

Click here to download the editable, printable, and digital reading choice boards for fiction and non-fiction text!

Reading Choice Boards for Elementary and Middle School
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Use the list of reading response prompts below to make your own choice board. If you’re still not sure about implementing a student choice board, click HERE to download a free printable and digital choice board for fiction text. You can try it with your students, and see how it goes.

18 Fiction Choice Board Prompts
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  • Draw a detailed picture of the setting. Describe your picture using at least three complete sentences.
  • Compare yourself to one of the characters in the text. Include two similarities and two differences.
  • First, describe the main problem presented in the text. Next, describe how the problem is resolved.
  • Explain the mood of the text. List three words from the text that support your mood choice.
  • Find, record, and explain one simile or one metaphor used in the text.
  • Identify at least one possible theme for this text. Explain your theme choice using at least three sentences.
  • Write three questions that came to mind while or after reading this text.
  • First, define a new word you learned from  reading this text. Next, use the word in an original sentence.
  • Make a connection between the text and something in your life or something in another text.
  • Write a five-sentence summary of the text. Include major events and avoid minor details.
  • Choose an adjective to describe a character. State evidence from the text to support your adjective choice.
  • Create a timeline that includes five events from the text. Include a short description and picture of each event.
  • Find a new word you learned from reading this text. Draw a picture to represent the word’s meaning.
  • Write a diary or journal entry for one character. The entry should be at least five sentences.
  • Change the ending of the text. Describe how the changes affect at least two of the characters.
  • Using at least four sentences, predict what might happen if the text were to continue.
  • Would you recommend this text to a friend? State why or why not using at least four sentences.
  • Write three questions about the text you would like to ask the author.

Click here to download the editable, printable, and digital reading choice boards for fiction and non-fiction text!

editable, printable, digital student choice boards
Non-Fiction Choice Board Prompts
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  • State the main idea of this text using only one sentence.
  • Write three multiple choice questions that can be answered by reading this text.
  • State another possible title for this text. Explain your new title choice using two complete sentences.
  • Write a five-sentence summary of the text. Include main points and avoid minor details.
  • State something you wish the author included more or less of in this text. Explain why.
  • Compare this text to another text on the same topic. State one similarity and one difference.
  • Would you recommend this text to a friend? State why or why not using at least four sentences.
  • Find a new word you learned from reading this text. Draw a picture to represent the word’s meaning.
  • Would you like to learn more about this topic? Explain why or why not using at least four complete sentences.
  • First, state the topic of the text. Next, list three details about this topic you learned from reading this text.
  • Record three facts stated in this text. Answer using complete sentences.
  • Explain why the author wrote this text. Answer using at least four complete sentences.
  • How do the pictures or graphics help you understand the text? Answer using at least three sentences.
  • Did you enjoy this text? Defend your answer using at least four complete sentences.
  • Make a connection between something in this text and something in your life.
  • Write three questions that came to mind while or after reading this text.
  • First, define a new word you learned from reading this text. Next, use the word in an original sentence.
  • Create a detailed illustration that could be added to support this text.

Editable, Printable, & Digital Reading Response Choice Boards

36 Choice Board Prompts for Any Texts
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